Last updated on October 25th, 2023 at 11:27 am

How Many Overs in ODI? Understanding the Essence of ODI Cricket

Cricket, a sport beloved by millions around the world, offers various formats that cater to different preferences. One such format is One Day International (ODI) cricket, which strikes a balance between the shorter T20 matches and the more extended Test matches. This comprehensive article will delve into the world of ODI cricket, covering its meaning, history, rules, records, top players, etc. So, if you’re a cricket enthusiast seeking to enhance your knowledge of ODI cricket, read on!

How Many Overs in ODI?

An ODI match is a limited-overs cricket game played between two international teams. Each team has the opportunity to bat and bowl for a specific number of overs, which is fixed for the match. The standard number of overs in an ODI match is 50 per side. Therefore, each team gets 300 legal deliveries (6 balls per over x 50 overs) to showcase their skills, whether they’re batting or bowling. In rare cases of a tie in the match, a “super over” may be played to determine the winner, where each team gets one over to bat and bowl, typically consisting of 6 deliveries per side.

What is ODI in Cricket?

ODI stands for One Day International, and it is a form of limited-overs cricket. The International Cricket Council (ICC) introduced this format to provide a more time-efficient alternative to Test matches while still retaining a considerable portion of the excitement and drama. The number of overs is 50 and ODI matches have a set duration of one day, making them more accessible to spectators and players alike, especially in today’s fast-paced world.

ODI Cricket Meaning and Origin

The origin of ODI cricket can be traced back to the early 1970s when cricket administrators sought to bring a new, engaging format to the sport. The first-ever ODI match was played on January 5, 1971, between Australia and England at the iconic Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG). This marked the beginning of a new era in cricket, captivating fans and players with its dynamic gameplay.

ODI Cricket: The One-Day Series

ODI cricket often involves bilateral One-Day Series between two international teams. These series typically consist of multiple matches, played on consecutive days or with gaps between them. Bilateral series provide a competitive platform for teams to face each other in different conditions and venues, fostering a healthy rivalry between cricketing nations.

Rules of ODI Cricket

ODI cricket has its own set of rules, governed by the ICC, to ensure fair play and maintain the balance between bat and ball. Some key rules in ODI cricket include:

  • Powerplay: During the first ten overs, only two fielders are allowed outside the 30-yard circle, known as the “powerplay.” It provides an opportunity for the batting team to capitalize on the fielding restrictions.
  • No-Ball and Wide Rules: Umpires call “no-ball” when a bowler oversteps the crease or delivers an illegal ball. Similarly, “wide” is called when the ball is out of the batsman’s reach. Both instances result in extra runs for the batting team.
  • Free Hits: If a bowler delivers a no-ball, the next delivery is a “free hit.” It means the batsman cannot be dismissed except through a run-out.
  • Fielding Restrictions: During the non-powerplay overs, a maximum of four fielders is allowed outside the 30-yard circle, promoting aggressive batting.

Field Restrictions and Power Play

In ODI cricket, fielding restrictions play a crucial role in determining the batting team’s approach and the bowling team’s strategy. Let’s explore the two key fielding restrictions and the power play in detail:

  • Powerplay 1: The first ten overs of an ODI match constitute Powerplay 1. During this period, only two fielders are permitted outside the 30-yard circle. This restriction allows the batsmen to target boundary shots and accumulate runs quickly.
  • Powerplay 2 and 3: After the conclusion of Powerplay 1, the batting team can choose when to take Powerplay 2 and Powerplay 3. Each of these two powerplays consists of five overs, during which three fielders are allowed outside the 30-yard circle.

The strategic utilization of these powerplays by the batting team and the tactical bowling changes by the fielding team significantly influence the match’s outcome.

Trial Regulations

Under the topic of “Trial Regulation” in cricket, an intriguing term that emerged was the introduction of “Supersub.” These regulations were designed to allow teams to bring in a replacement player at any stage during the match. The Supersub, as the replacement player was popularly known, could contribute to batting, bowling, fielding, or wicket-keeping duties once substituted into the game. However, teams were required to nominate the replacement player even before the toss took place. These rules were in effect for approximately six months before being revoked.

The decision to withdraw the Supersub rule was primarily driven by concerns that it favored the team winning the toss. The flexibility of introducing a specialized player based on the match situation provided an advantage to the team that won the toss, leading to an imbalance in the competition. As a result, the cricketing authorities decided to discontinue the Supersub regulations, returning to the traditional format without the provision for mid-match replacements.

Cricket Teams with ODI Status

In the world of One Day International (ODI) cricket, certain teams hold the esteemed ODI status and are ranked based on their performances in ODI matches. The International Cricket Council (ICC) regularly updates the rankings, providing an overview of the top-performing ODI teams. Let’s take a look at the current rankings:

PosTEAMMATCHESPOINTS.RATING
1Australia232714118
2Pakistan202,31616
3India33,80715
4New Zealand72,806104
5England242,426101
6South Africa191910101
7Bangladesh272,52093
8Afghanistan15136191
9SriLanka322,79487
10WestIndies352,31266

ODI Records: Pushing the Boundaries of Excellence

Top Batsman- ODI

Pos

Batsman Player

Team

Rating

1

Babar Azam

PAK

886

2

Rassie van der Dussen

SA

777

3

Fakhar Zaman

PAK

755

4

Imam-ul-Haq

PAK

745

5

Shubman Gill

IND

738

6

Harry Tector

IRE

726

7

David Warner

AUS

726

8

Virat Kohli

IND

719

9

Quinton de Kock

SA

718

10

Rohit Sharma

IND

707

Please note that these rankings are dynamic and can change based on players’ performances in ODI matches. The ICC updates these rankings regularly, reflecting the current form and consistency of players in the ODI format.

Top Bowlers- ODI

POS

PLAYER

TEAM

RATING

1

Josh Hazlewood

AUS

705

2

Mohammed Siraj

IND

691

3

Mitchell Starc

AUS

686

4

Rashid Khan

AFG

682

5

Matt Henry

NZ

667

6

Mujeeb Ur Rahman

AFG

661

7

Trent Boult

NZ

660

8

Adam Zampa

AUS

652

9

Shaheen Afridi

PAK

630

10

Shakib Al Hasan

BAN

618

These rankings are continuously updated by the ICC, reflecting the current form and performance of bowlers in One Day International (ODI) cricket. Bowlers with higher ratings are deemed to be in top form and are crucial assets for their respective teams in ODI matches.

All Rounders- ODI 

Pos

All Rounders Player

Team

Rating

1

Shakib Al Hasan

BAN

371

2

Mohammad Nabi

AFG

298

3

Sikandar Raza

ZIM

287

4

Rashid Khan

AFG

272

5

Assad Vala

PNG

248

6

Zeeshan Maqsood

OMA

235

7

Mitchell Santner

NZ

234

8

Wanindu Hasaranga

SL

233

9

Mehedi Hasan

BAN

228

10

Chris Woakes

ENG

215

Tournaments – Asia Cup, T20, and World Cup

ODI cricket showcases some of the most prestigious tournaments in the cricketing world. Three of the most notable ODI tournaments are:

  • Asia Cup: The Asia Cup is a biennial tournament featuring teams from Asia, competing for regional supremacy.

  • T20 World Cup: Though T20 cricket is a distinct format, the T20 World Cup is a highly anticipated event that brings together teams from all cricketing nations for thrilling, fast-paced cricket.

  • ICC Cricket World Cup: The pinnacle of ODI cricket is the ICC Cricket World Cup, held every four years. It is a platform for teams to compete for the most coveted trophy in ODI cricket.

 

Conclusion

One Day Cricket has truly become the heartbeat of the sport, captivating fans with its competitive spirit and unforgettable moments. Understanding the essence of one day cricket, its history, rules, records, and top players enriches the experience of following this enthralling format. Whether it’s the scintillating boundaries or the nail-biting run chases, ODI cricket never fails to entertain. As the game continues to evolve, it promises to produce more legends, redefine records, and etch its mark on the cricketing world.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

During Powerplay 1 (first ten overs), only two fielders are allowed outside the 30-yard circle.

 

Rohit Sharma of India holds the record for the highest individual score, with 264 runs.

The ICC Cricket World Cup is held every four years.

Muttiah Muralitharan of Sri Lanka holds the record for the most wickets, with 534 wickets.

 

 

T20 (Twenty20) cricket is shorter than ODI, with each team playing 20 overs.

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  • What is One Day International (ODI)T20?

  • ODI T20 is not a specific term; it seems to be a combination of One Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 (T20) cricket formats, which are two distinct formats with different rules and match durations.

There are 300 balls in 50 overs.

ODI T20 is not a specific term; it seems to be a combination of One Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 (T20) cricket formats, which are two distinct formats with different rules and match durations.